Journal of Molecular Evolution

, Volume 17, Issue 1, pp 31–42

Ancient repeated sequences in the pea and mung bean genomes and implications for genome evolution

  • Michael G. Murray
  • Debra L. Peters
  • William F. Thompson
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF01792422

Cite this article as:
Murray, M.G., Peters, D.L. & Thompson, W.F. J Mol Evol (1981) 17: 31. doi:10.1007/BF01792422

Abstract

Essentially all of the sequences in the pea (Pisum sativum) genome which reassociate with single copy kinetics at standard (Tm -25°C) criterion follow repetitive kinetics at lower temperatures (about Tm-35°C). Analysis of thermal stability profiles for presumptive single copy duplexes show that they contain substantial mismatch even when formed at standard criterion. Thus most of the sequences in the pea genome which are conventionally defined as “single copy” are actually “fossil repeats” — that is, they are members of extensively diverged (mutuated) and thus presumably ancient families of repeated sequences. Coding sequences as represented by a cDNA probe prepared from poly-somal poly(A) + mRNA reassociate with single copy kinetics regardless of criterion and do not form mismatched duplexes. The coding regions thus appear to be composed of true single copy sequences but they cannot represent more than a few percent of the pea genome. Ancient diverged repeats are present, but not a prominent feature of the smaller mung bean (Vigna radiata) genome. An extension of a simple evolutionary model is proposed in which these and other differences in genome organization are considered to reflect different rates of sequence amplification or genome turnover during evolution. The model accounts for some of the differences between typical plant and animal genomes.

Key words

Pea Mung bean Genome organization Evolution Amplification Repetitive DNA Single copy DNA 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael G. Murray
    • 1
  • Debra L. Peters
    • 1
  • William F. Thompson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant BiologyCarnegie Institution of WashingtonStanfordUSA

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