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Acta Neurochirurgica

, Volume 97, Issue 3–4, pp 139–145 | Cite as

Effect of acetazolamide on cerebral artery blood velocity and regional cerebral blood flow in normal subjects

  • W. Sorteberg
  • K. -F. Lindegaard
  • K. Rootwelt
  • A. Dahl
  • R. Nyberg-Hansen
  • D. Russell
  • H. Nornes
Laboratory Research

Summary

The effect of intravenous acetazolamide L g on cerebral artery blood velocity and regional blood flow (rCBF) was investigated in eight normal subjects. Blood velocity was measured with 2 MHz pulsed Doppler in the proximal segments of the middle, anterior and posterior cerebral artery (MCA, ACA, and PCA) and in the distal extracranial internal carotid artery (ICA). The rCBF in the regions of interest tentatively corresponding to the perfusion territories of these vessels was estimated using133Xe inhalation and a rapidly rotating single photon emission computer tomograph.

Both blood velocity and rCBF increased after acetazolamide. There was no significant difference between the percentage ICA blood velocity increase (22 ± 12%) and the percentage rCBF increase in the ICA region of interest (25 ± 9%). In the MCA, ACA, and PCA, however, blood velocity increased more (mean increase 36–42%) than the rCBF in the corresponding regions of interest (mean increase 24–26%). These differences were highly significant suggesting a direct and site specific effect of acetazolamide in narrowing the lumen of the proximal MCA, ACA, and PCA, but not of the extracranial ICA. We also propose that the effect of acetazolamide induces reciprocal changes in the extent of adjacent perfusion territories in individual brain hemispheres.

Data compiled from all subjects investigated at two very different perfusion levels (before and after acetazolamide) revealed a significant positive correlation between blood velocity and rCBF.

Keywords

Acetazolamide blood velocity cerebral blood flow normal subjects transcranial Doppler ultrasound 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Sorteberg
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. -F. Lindegaard
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. Rootwelt
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Dahl
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Nyberg-Hansen
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. Russell
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. Nornes
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryInstitute of Clinical Biochemistry (Section of Nuclear Medicine)Norway
  2. 2.Department of Neurology, Rikshospitalet, The National HospitalUniversity of OsloOsloNorway

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