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Environmental Geochemistry and Health

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 77–80 | Cite as

Chromatographic measurement of molecular markers of sources of atmospheric aerosol particles

  • Pamela R. Veltkamp
  • Kristen J. Hansen
  • Robert M. Barkley
  • Robert E. Sievers
Article

Abstract

Various organic compounds in aerosol particles in ambient air near a coniferous forest fire in Boulder, Colorado were identified as molecular markers of wood burning and forest fires. Particle samples were collected by filtering small volumes of air. The samples were analysed using thermal desorption followed by gas chromatographic separation and detection, a highly sensitive analytical method. Several compounds unique to softwood combustion were identified in the samples. Additionally, a predominance of odd-carbon-numbered n-alkanes over the corresponding even-carbon-numbered n-alkanes was observed. This predominance is a well-documented molecular pattern indicative of epicutical waxes in plants.

Keywords

Thermal desorption organic aerosol particles molecular markers forest fire 

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pamela R. Veltkamp
    • 1
  • Kristen J. Hansen
    • 1
  • Robert M. Barkley
    • 1
  • Robert E. Sievers
    • 1
  1. 1.Global Change and Environmental Quality Program, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, Department of Chemistry and BiochemistryUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA

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