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Indocyanine green angiography in choroidal osteoma

  • Bart A. Lafaut
  • Caroline Mestdagh
  • Takeya Kohno
  • Alain Gaudric
  • Jean Jacques De Laey
Short Communication

Abstract

• Background: Choroidal osteoma is a rare choroidal tumor; knowledge of its indocyanine green characteristics is limited. • Methods: The fundus photographs and the fluorescein and indocyanine green angiograms of three patients were reviewed. Each patient was examined at least twice with a follow-up varying from 10 to 60 months. • Results: Latephase fluorescein angiograms allow assessment of the extension of the osteoma as it is variably hyperfluorescent due to tumor staining combined with a variable degree of overlying retinal pigment epithelial changes. The hypofluorescent area observed in the early phase of the indocyanine green angiogram corresponds with the extent of the osteoma but the borders may be difficult to demarcate. In the late phase of the indocyanine green angiogram, hypofluorescence due to choriocapillaris loss and hyperfluorescence due to leakage from abnormal choroidal vessels are combined. Infrared angiography highlights abnormal choroidal vessels and vascular spiders present on the tumor surface. It is difficult to differentiate these choroidal vascular anomalies from subretinal neovascularization. • Conclusion: We find no homogeneous pattern either on fluorescein or on infrared angiography. The findings may change with follow-up, indicating changes within the tumor or the surrounding tissue that are still poorly understood.

Keywords

Fluorescein Retinal Pigment Indocyanine Green Vascular Anomaly Fundus Photograph 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bart A. Lafaut
    • 1
  • Caroline Mestdagh
    • 1
  • Takeya Kohno
    • 1
  • Alain Gaudric
    • 2
  • Jean Jacques De Laey
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyUniversity HospitalGentBelgium
  2. 2.Department of OphthalmologyHôpital LariboisièreParisFrance

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