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Journal of East Asian Linguistics

, Volume 2, Issue 2, pp 125–134 | Cite as

Long vowels in Proto-Japanese

  • Alexander Vovin
Article
  • 121 Downloads

Abstract

The goal of this article is to provide internal and partial external evidence that Proto-Japanese had both vowel length and pitch accent. The author examines the evidence from Ryukyuan dialects of Japanese and from prehistoric Japanese loanwords in the Ainu language. This combined evidence demonstrates that the majority of Pre-Proto-Japanese words with initial vowel length may be associated with an initial low pitch. However, there are also certain words which combine initial high pitch and initial vowel length. Comparative data from Tungusic and Korean are also used.

Keywords

Comparative Data High Pitch Combine Evidence Pitch Accent External Evidence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexander Vovin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Asian Languages and CulturesUniversity of MichiganAnn Arbor

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