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Asia Pacific Journal of Management

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 85–103 | Cite as

Recent trends in Australian countertrade: A cross-national analysis

  • Aspy P. Palia
  • Peter W. Liesch
Articles

Abstract

This paper presents and analyses data on recent trends in both voluntary and government-mandated countertrade in Australia. The analysis reveals that compensation is the most frequently used form of countertrade. The USSR and the PRC are the major nations involved. The primary category of Australian imports are capital goods. Inputs and capital goods are the major categories of Australian exports. Both Australian imports and exports are primarily finished products. Aerospace products, computer software systems, and hardware components are the major categories of civil offsets. The aerospace and weapons-related industries are the major categories of defence offsets. A familiarity with recent trends in Australian reciprocal trade will enable international marketing managers to identify and take advantage of emerging opportunities in the Australian marketplace.

Keywords

Analyse Data Marketing Recent Trend Major Category Computer Software System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Faculty of Business Administration National University of Singapore 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aspy P. Palia
    • 1
  • Peter W. Liesch
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Hawaii at ManoaUSA
  2. 2.University College of Southern QueenslandAustralia

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