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Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 21, Issue 6, pp 522–536 | Cite as

Intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEPi)

  • A. Rossi
  • G. Polese
  • G. Brandi
  • G. Conti
Review Article

Keywords

Public Health Emergency Medicine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Rossi
    • 1
  • G. Polese
    • 2
  • G. Brandi
    • 3
  • G. Conti
    • 4
  1. 1.Fisiopatologia Respiratoria, Divisione di PneumologiaOspedale Maggiore di Borgo TrentoVeronaItaly
  2. 2.Servizio PneumofisiologicoVeronaItaly
  3. 3.Institute of Human PhysiologyUniversity of PadovaPadovaItaly
  4. 4.Institute of Anaesthesia and Intensive CareUniversity “La Sapienza”RomeItaly

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