Virchows Archiv A

, Volume 421, Issue 4, pp 323–330

An immunohistochemical study of the breast using antibodies to basal and luminal keratins, alpha-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, collagen IV and laminin

Part II: epitheliosis and ductal carcinoma in situ
  • Werner Böcker
  • Bert Bier
  • Götz Freytag
  • Bettina Brömmelkamp
  • Ernst-Dieter Jarasch
  • Georg Edel
  • Barbara Dockhorn-Dworniczak
  • Kurt W. Schmid
Original Articles

Summary

A detailed immunohistochemical study has been carried out on 63 breast lesions with epitheliosis, ductal carcinoma in situ and clinging carcinoma (lobular cancerization), using antibodies directed against keratins 5/14 and 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, vimentin, smooth muscle actin, collagen IV and laminin. The results have shown that epitheliosis on the one hand and ductal in situ and clinging carcinoma on the other are immunohistochemically different epithelial lesions. Epitheliosis appears to be epithelial hyperplasia with keratin 5/14 and keratin 14, 15, 16, 18, 19-positive cells. Compared to epitheliotic cells tumor cells of clinging carcinoma, lobular cancerization and ductal carcinoma in situ expressed only luminal keratins 14, 15, 16, 18, 19 in 85% of the cases studied; whereas in 15% there was a basal keratin expression. From our results we conclude that the clinging carcinoma (lobular cancerization) represents the initial morphological step in the development of ductal carcinoma in situ and thus may be interpreted as a minimal ductal neoplasia. With the immunohistochemical demonstration of basal and luminal keratins it may be possible in individual cases to differentiate between benign and malignant in situ lesions of the breast.

Key words

Hyperplastic breast lesions Anti-keratin antibody Anti-smooth muscle actin antibody Anti-vimentin antibody Anti-collagen IV antibody Immunohistology 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Werner Böcker
    • 1
  • Bert Bier
    • 1
  • Götz Freytag
    • 1
  • Bettina Brömmelkamp
    • 1
  • Ernst-Dieter Jarasch
    • 2
  • Georg Edel
    • 1
  • Barbara Dockhorn-Dworniczak
    • 1
  • Kurt W. Schmid
  1. 1.Gerhard Domagk Institute of PathologyUniversity of MünsterMünsterFederal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Institute of Cell and Tumour Biology, German Cancer Research CentreUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergFederal Republic of Germany

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