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Infection

, Volume 16, Issue 6, pp 337–344 | Cite as

Clinical experience with ciprofloxacin in the treatment of urinary tract infections: A review

  • H. van Poppel
  • L. Baert
  • V. Chyský
  • R. Hullmann
Originalia

Summary

During the clinical development of ciprofloxacin 1,519 treatments of UTI were documented. The most frequent specific diagnoses were uncomplicated UTI (46.6%), followed by non-specified UTI (21.7%), complicated UTI (19.4%), acute pyelonephritis (7.6%) and chronic pyelonephritis (4.1%). 70% of the causative organisms isolated were Enterobacteriaceae (Escherichia coli 38%,Proteus spp. 10% andKlebsiella pneumoniae 10%).Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurred in approximately 20% of the cases and the remaining 10% were gram-positive aerobes. Clinical resolution was achieved in about 90% in all specific diagnoses. The eradication rate for gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae was 93.8%, forP. aeruginosa 81.8% and for gram-positive aerobes 90.2%. Studies comparing ciprofloxacin and standard treatment have shown the high efficacy of ciprofloxacin making it a preferred agent particularly for infections caused by pathogens less susceptible to conventional drugs. According to the experience of clinical trials the recommended ciprofloxacin dose varies between 100 and 500 mg b.i.d. orally depending on the severity of clinical status and the susceptibility of the pathogen.

Keywords

Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Pyelonephritis Specific Diagnosis Eradication Rate Causative Organism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Klinische Erfahrungen bei der Behandlung von Harnwegsinfektionen mit Ciprofloxacin — Aktuelle Übersicht

Zusammenfassung

Während der klinischen Entwicklungsphase des Ciprofloxacin wurden Daten von 1519 Patienten, die an Harnwegsinfektionen litten, dokumentiert. Die am häufigsten vorkommenden spezifischen Diagnosen waren unkomplizierte Harnwegsinfektionen (46,6%), gefolgt von nicht-spezifischen Harnwegsinfektionen (21,7%), komplizierten Harnwegsinfektionen (19,4%), akuter Pyelonephritis (7,6%) und chronischer Pyelonephritis (4,1%). 70% der isolierten Erreger waren Enterobacteriaceae (Escherichia coli 38%,Proteus spp. 10% undKlebsiella pneumoniae 10%), etwa 20%Pseudomonas aeruginosa und die restlichen 10% grampositive Aerobier. Die klinische Heilung betrug bei allen spezifischen Diagnosen etwa 90%. Die Eliminationsrate aus dem Urin lag für gramnegative Enterobacteriaceae bei 93,8%, fürP. aeruginosa bei 81,8% und für grampositive Aerobier bei 90,2%. Vergleichsstudien zeigten hohe Ciprofloxacin-Wirksamkeit besonders bei Erregern, die gegen herkömmliche Antibiotika weniger empfindlich sind. Aufgrund der Erfahrungen aus klinischen Studien liegt die empfohlene orale Ciprofloxacin-Dosierung zwischen 100 und 500 mg, gegeben zweimal am Tag. Diese Dosierung ist abhängig vom Schweregrad der Erkrankung und der Empfindlichkeit der Erreger.

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Copyright information

© MMV Medizin Verlag GmbH München 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. van Poppel
    • 1
  • L. Baert
    • 1
  • V. Chyský
    • 2
  • R. Hullmann
    • 2
  1. 1.Urology DepartmentCatholic University of LeuvenLeuvenBelgium
  2. 2.Bayer AG, Pharma Research CenterWuppertal 1

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