Infection

, Volume 5, Issue 2, pp 82–84

Murine typhus and spotted fever in Israel in the seventies

  • T. Rosenthal
  • D. Michaeli
Article

Summary

One hundred and eleven cases of rickettsial disease-100 cases of murine typhus and 11 cases spotted fever-seen over a four year period at the Chaim Sheba Medical Center are reviewed. The clinical picture of murine typhus (caused by Rickettsia mooseri and transmitted by Xenopsylla cheopis) could not be distinguished from that of spotted fever (caused by a Rickettsia similar to Rickettsia conori and transmitted by Rhipicephalus). Some quite severe cases of murine typhus and some relatively mild cases of spotted fever were seen.

Mäusetyphus und Fleckfieber in Israel in den 70er Jahren

Zusammenfassung

Es werden 111 Fälle von Rickettsienerkrankung — 100 Fälle von Mäusetyphus und 11 Fälle von Fleckfieber — ausgewertet, die während eines vierjährigen Zeitraumes im Chaim Sheba Medical Center zur Beobachtung gelangten. Das klinische Krankheitsbild des Mäusetyphus (hervorgerufen durch Rickettsia mooseri und übertragen durch Xenopsylla cheopis) ließ sich nicht von dem beim Fleckfieber (hervorgerufen durch eine der Rickettsia conori ähnlichen Rickettsie und übertragen durch Rhipicephalus) beobachteten Bild unterscheiden. Es fanden sich ziemlich schwere Fälle von Mäusetyphus und relativ leichte Fälle von Fleckfieber.

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Copyright information

© Verlagsgesellschaft Otto Spatz 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Rosenthal
    • 1
  • D. Michaeli
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicine D and Division of Infectious Diseases, The Chaim Sehba Medical CenterTel Aviv University Medical SchoolTel-HashomerIsrael

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