Correlations between lead, cadmium, copper, zinc, and iron concentrations in frozen tuna fish

  • L. Galindo
  • A. Hardisson
  • F. García Montelongo
Article

Keywords

Iron Copper Zinc Waste Water Cadmium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Establier R (1970) Copper, iron, manganese and zinc levels in several organs ofThunnus thynnus. Inv Pesq 34:399–408Google Scholar
  2. Evans WH, Read JL, Lucas MB (1978) Evaluation of a method for the determination of total Cd, Pb and Ni in foodstuffs using measurements by flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. Analyst 103:580–594Google Scholar
  3. Mershina KM, Khalina NM, Krasnitskaya AI (1962) Trace elements in far-eastern fish, crustaceans and mollusks Mykroelementy v Vost Sibiri i na dal'n Vost, Inform Byul Koordinats Komis po Mikroelementam dlya Sibiri i Dal'n Vost (1):35–43; Chem Abstr (1963) 59:13270Google Scholar
  4. Nie N, Hull CH, Jenkins JC, Steinbrenner K, Bent DH (1975) Statistical package for the social sciences. 2nd Ed. McGraw-Hill, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  5. Uthe, JF, Bligh EG (1971) preliminary survey of heavy metal contamination in Canadian freshwater fish. J Fish Res Board Can 28:786–788Google Scholar
  6. Vinogradov AP (1953) The elementary composition of Marine organisms. Sears Foundation for Marine Research, Yale University, Memoir IIGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Galindo
    • 1
  • A. Hardisson
    • 1
  • F. García Montelongo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Analytical ChemistryUniversity of La LagunaLa LagunaSpain

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