Personal Technologies

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 6–24 | Cite as

A digital photography framework enabling affective awareness in home communication

Article

Abstract

By transforming the personal computer into a communication appliance, the Internet has initiated the true home computing revolution. As a result, Computer Mediated Communication (CMC) technologies are increasingly used in domestic settings, and are changing the way people keep in touch with their relatives and friends. This article first looks at how CMC tools are currently used in the home, and points at some of their benefits and limitations. Most of these tools supportexplicit interpersonal communication, by providing a new medium for sustaining conversations. The need for tools supportingimplicit interaction between users, in more natural and effottless ways, is then argued for. The idea of affective awareness is introduced as a general sense of being in touch with one's family and friends. Finally, the KAN-G framework, which enables affective awareness through the exchange of digital photographs, is described. Various components, which make the capture, distribution, observation and annotation of snapshots easy and effortless, are discussed.

Keywords

Affective awareness Ambient media Calm technology Computer Mediated Communication Digital camera Home photography implicit social interaction Social role of home photography Ubiquitous computing World Wide Web 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Information Systems LaboratoryHigashi-HiroshimaJapan

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