Journal of Religion and Health

, Volume 24, Issue 3, pp 197–208 | Cite as

Religion and youth substance use

  • Barbara R. Lorch
  • Robert H. Hughes
Article

Abstract

This research study of 13,878 youths indicates that religion is not by itself a very important predictor of youth substance use. It is, however, more strongly related to alcohol use than drug use. Also, fundamentalist religious groups have the lowest percentages of substance use in general, while the more liberal types of religious groups have the lowest percentages of heavy substance use. Of the six dimensions of religion used in the study to predict youth substance use, importance of religion to the subject was the most important, with church membership second, and the fundamentalism-liberalism scale of religious groups third.

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Copyright information

© Institutes of Religion and Health 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara R. Lorch
    • 1
  • Robert H. Hughes
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Colorado at Colorado SpringsColorado SpringsUSA

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