Mathematical Programming

, Volume 71, Issue 2, pp 153–177 | Cite as

An efficient cost scaling algorithm for the assignment problem

  • Andrew V. Goldberg
  • Robert Kennedy
Article

Abstract

The cost scaling push-relabel method has been shown to be efficient for solving minimum-cost flow problems. In this paper we apply the method to the assignment problem and investigate implementations of the method that take advantage of assignment's special structure. The results show that the method is very promising for practical use.

Keywords

Network optimization Assignment problem Algorithms Experimental evaluation Cost scaling 

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Copyright information

© The Mathematical Programming Society, Inc. 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew V. Goldberg
    • 1
  • Robert Kennedy
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Science DepartmentStanford UniversityStanfordUnited States

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