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Journal of Neural Transmission

, Volume 76, Issue 2, pp 109–117 | Cite as

The effects of oral 5-hydroxytryptophan administration on feeding behavior in obese adult female subjects

  • F. Ceci
  • C. Cangiano
  • M. Cairella
  • A. Cascino
  • M. Del Ben
  • M. Muscaritoli
  • L. Sibilia
  • F. Rossi Fanelli
Original Papers

Summary

Nineteen obese female subjects with body mass index ranging between 30 and 40 were included in a double-blind crossover study aimed at evaluating the effects of oral 5-hydroxytryptophan administration on feeding behavior, mood state and weight loss. Either 5-hydroxytryptophan (8 mg/kg/day) or placebo was administered for five weeks during which patients were not prescribed any dietary restrictions. Feeding behavior was investigated by means of a questionnaire designed to establish the onset of anorexia and related symptoms. Food intake was evaluated using a three-day diet diary. BDI, SI, STAI-T, and STAI-S were used to assess mood state. The administration of 5-hydroxytryptophan resulted in no changes in mood state but promoted typical anorexiarelated symptoms, decreased food intake and weight loss during the period of observation.

Keywords

5-Hydroxytryptophan feeding behavior obesity serotoninergic system tryptophan 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Ceci
    • 1
  • C. Cangiano
    • 1
  • M. Cairella
    • 2
  • A. Cascino
    • 1
  • M. Del Ben
    • 2
  • M. Muscaritoli
    • 1
  • L. Sibilia
    • 2
  • F. Rossi Fanelli
    • 1
  1. 1.III. Department of Internal MedicineLaboratory of Clinical NutritionItaly
  2. 2.Day Hospital, Servizio di Dietetica, Istituto di Terapia Medica SistematicaUniversity of Rome “La Sapienza”RomeItaly

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