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Current Microbiology

, Volume 8, Issue 5, pp 269–271 | Cite as

Oxidase testing from Kligler's iron agar and triple sugar iron agar slants

  • Janet K. Skillern
  • Timothy L. Overman
Article

Abstract

Many members of the familyVibrionaceae have been implicated as causative agents of diarrhea. Most of these organisms are non-lactose fermenters, and all are oxidase-positive. If the oxidase test could be reliably performed on growth from the surface of Kligler's iron agar and/or triple sugar iron agar slants, it would aid in the screening of potential stool pathogens. Forty-six isolates from the generaAeromonas, Plesiomonas, andVibrio were inoculated onto Kligler's iron agar and triple sugar iron agar slants, incubated overnight, and tested for oxidase activity. All 46 isolates produced alkaline over acid, with or without gas, Kligler's iron agar slants and were oxidase-positive. On triple sugar iron agar slants, 13 isolates produced these same patterns, and all were oxidase-positive. Acid over acid, with gas, triple sugar iron agar slants were produced by 18 isolates, and all were oxidase-positive. Acid over acid, without gas, triple sugar iron agar slants were produced by 15 isolates, and all were oxidase-negative. These negative oxidase tests were due to low pH. Oxidase tests performed from the surface of Kligler's iron agar and triple sugar iron agar slants used to screen stool isolates were reliable, provided the slants were acid over acid with gas, or alkaline over acid with or without gas. Kligler's iron agar is recommended with this procedure, since most potential stool pathogens of both theEnterobacteriaceae and theVibrionaceae will produce an alkaline over acid, with or without gas, slant, and false negative oxidase tests will be minimized.

Keywords

Iron Sugar Agar Diarrhea Causative Agent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janet K. Skillern
    • 1
  • Timothy L. Overman
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Pathology ServiceVeterans Administration Medical CenterLexington
  2. 2.Department of Pathology, College of MedicineUniversity of KentuckyLexington

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