Journal of autism and childhood schizophrenia

, Volume 1, Issue 3, pp 311–326

Intellectuality in parents of psychotic, subnormal, and normal children

  • John Allen
  • Marian K. DeMyer
  • James A. Norton
  • William Pontius
  • Ellen Yang
Article

Abstract

Due to etiological implications, parental intellectuality defined by 29 descriptive rating scales was compared in 96 families. Parents represented 33 autistic and schizophrenic children, 33 matched normals, and 30 subnormals. Data was obtained from objectively rated interviews, WAIS and other scales. All groups were alike in characteristics they sought in spouses and children, premarital interests, reading preferences, and life style. With the child's age, sex, ordinal position, race, religion and SES held constant, only one significant difference was found between parents of normal and autistic children. The latter emphasized academic success less in autistic than matched normals in their children. All parents of deviant children desired improvement in speech and relatedness, realistically deemphasizing intellectual achievement. Fathers' verbal IQs were significantly higher for autistic than subnormal groups. Parents of normals were significantly younger at child's birth, an unexpected finding implying a neurological link between autism and subnormality.

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Copyright information

© Scripta Publishing Corporation 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Allen
    • 1
  • Marian K. DeMyer
    • 1
  • James A. Norton
    • 1
  • William Pontius
    • 1
  • Ellen Yang
    • 1
  1. 1.Indiana University School of MedicineUSA
  2. 2.Clinical Research Center for Early Childhood SchizophreniaLaRue D. Carter Memorial HospitalIndianapolis

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