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Archives of Sexual Behavior

, Volume 22, Issue 2, pp 157–168 | Cite as

A factor analysis of the Klein sexual orientation Grid in two disparate samples

  • James D. Weinrich
  • Peter J. Snyder
  • Richard C. Pillard
  • Igor Grant
  • Denise L. Jacobson
  • S. Renée Robinson
  • J. Allen McCutchan
Article

Abstract

Many researchers interested in sexual orientation can be separated into two camps: The “lumpers,” who try to reduce sexual classifications to as small a number of categories as possible, and the “splitters,” who try to show differences among groups and individuals that make classification schemes increasingly difficult and/or intricate. We report factor analyses of the Klein Grid (a questionnaire with 21 sexual orientation items) to see how many factors emerge in two samples of strikingly different origins. In both samples, the first factor to emerge loaded substantially on all of the Klein Grid's 21 items. This factor accounted for a majority of the variance. In both samples, a second, correlated factor emerged which indexed a separation between most of the items and those having to do with social and/or emotional preferences. In both samples, a third correlated factor also emerged, but this factor differed between the two populations: one refined the social/emotional distinction and the other distinguished ideal behavior from past and current behavior. We conclude on the basis of our analysis that both the lumpers and the splitters are correct.

Key words

Klein Grid sexual orientation factor analysis limerence lust 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • James D. Weinrich
    • 1
  • Peter J. Snyder
    • 2
  • Richard C. Pillard
    • 3
  • Igor Grant
    • 1
  • Denise L. Jacobson
    • 1
  • S. Renée Robinson
    • 1
  • J. Allen McCutchan
    • 1
  1. 1.HIV Neurobehavioral Research CenterUniversity of California, San DiegoSan DiegoUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryHillside Hospital—Research, Long Island Jewish Medical CenterGlen OaksUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryBoston University School of MedicineBostonUSA

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