Archives of Sexual Behavior

, Volume 15, Issue 1, pp 51–68 | Cite as

On the expression of H-Y antigen in transsexuals

  • Stephen Wachtel
  • Richard Green
  • Neal G. Simon
  • Alison Reichart
  • Linda Cahill
  • John Hall
  • Dean Nakamura
  • Gwendolyn Wachtel
  • Walter Futterweit
  • Stanley H. Biber
  • Charles Ihlenfeld

Abstract

Histocompatibility-Y (H-Y) antigen, the presumptive inducer of the mammalian testis, is present in the cells of normal males and not in the cells of normal females. Recent reports have implied that patients with transsexualism exhibit H-Y antigen phenotypes at variance with those of normal males and females and, thus, that H-Y serology might provide a tool for the diagnosis and study of the transsexual condition. We therefore evaluated blood and testicular cells from 21 male-to-female transsexuals using conventional and monoclonal H-Y antibodies. We found no evidence of abnormal H-Y phenotype. Five of the patients were interviewed postoperatively by two examiners and rated for the diagnosis of transsexualism. Three of the five were rated primary transsexual by one or both examiners, and two were rated secondary transsexual.

Key words

transsexual H-Y antigen sexual identity psychosexual differentiation 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Wachtel
    • 1
  • Richard Green
    • 2
  • Neal G. Simon
    • 3
  • Alison Reichart
    • 4
  • Linda Cahill
    • 4
  • John Hall
    • 4
  • Dean Nakamura
    • 4
  • Gwendolyn Wachtel
    • 1
  • Walter Futterweit
    • 5
  • Stanley H. Biber
    • 6
  • Charles Ihlenfeld
    • 2
  1. 1.The Center for Reproductive BiologySpring Creek RanchMemphisUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral ScienceState University of New York at Stony BrookStony BrookUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyLehigh UniversityBethlehemUSA
  4. 4.Division of Pediatric EndocrinologyCornell University Medical CollegeNew YorkUSA
  5. 5.Department of MedicineMount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  6. 6.Department of SurgeryMount San Rafael Hospital TrinidadUSA

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