Archives of Sexual Behavior

, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 65–78

Subjective and penile plethysmography responses to aversion therapy for homosexuality: A partial replication

  • N. McConaghy
  • D. Proctor
  • R. Barr
Article

Abstract

Forty patients were randomly assigned to receive apomorphine aversion or avoidance conditioning to reduce homosexual impulses. Prior to and following treatment, they were shown a film containing pictures of nude women preceded by pictures of a red circle and of nude men preceded by a green triangle. At 2 weeks following treatment, the patients showed significantly less penile volume increase to the pictures of men and penile volume decrease to the pictures of women, but no penile volume increase to the pictures of women. The changes in penile volume response of each patient correlated with the reduction in homosexual feeling he reported at follow-up 6 months later. There was no weakening of the change in penile volume responses at this time. Some statistically significant relationships were found between various measures of each patient's response to treatment and conditionability, but these were not present both at 2 weeks following treatment and at subsequent follow-up. Also, they differed from the relationships which were found to be statistically significant in an earlier study. It was concluded that they were chance relationships. Approximately half the patients reported possible or definite reduction in homosexual feeling and an increase in heterosexual feeling after 6 months or longer. The results are comparable with those of a previous study using apomorphine conditioning and aversion-relief therapy to treat homosexuality.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Feldman, M. P. (1969). Personal communication.Google Scholar
  2. Feldman, M. P., and MacCulloch, M. J. (1965). The application of anticipatory avoidance learning to the treatment of homosexuality. I. Theory, technique and preliminary results.Behav. Res. Therap. 2 165–183.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Freund, K. (1960). Some problems in the treatment of homosexuality. In Eysenck, H. J. (ed.),Behaviour Therapy and the Neuroses Pergamon Press, Oxford.Google Scholar
  4. Kinsey, A. C., Pomeroy, W. B., and Martin, C. E. (1948).Sexual Behaviour in the Human Male Saunders, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
  5. MacCulloch, H. J., and Feldman, M. P. (1967). Aversion therapy in management of 43 homosexuals.Brit. Med. J. 1 594–597.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. McConaghy, N. (1967). Penile volume change to moving pictures of male and female nudes in heterosexual and homosexual males.Behav. Res. Therap. 5 43–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. McConaghy, N. (1969). Subjective and penile plethysmograph responses following aversionrelief and apomorphine therapy for homosexual impulses.Brit. J. Psychiat. 115 723–730.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. McConaghy, N. (1970a). Subjective and penile plethysmograph responses to aversion therapy for homosexuality: A follow-up study.Brit. J. Psychiat. 117 555–560.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. McConaghy, N. (1970b). Penile response conditioning and its relationship to aversion therapy in homosexuals.Behav. Therap. 1 213–221.Google Scholar
  10. Siegel, S. (1956).Non-parametric Statistics for the Behavioural Sciences McGraw-Hill, New York.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. McConaghy
    • 1
  • D. Proctor
    • 1
  • R. Barr
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryPrince Henry Hospital, Little BaySydneyAustralia

Personalised recommendations