Archives of Sexual Behavior

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 121–133 | Cite as

Sexual arousal in women: A comparison of cognitive and physiological responses by continuous measurement

  • John P. Wincze
  • Peter Hoon
  • Emily Franck Hoon
Article

Abstract

Six sexually normal women were exposed to a wide variety of erotic video tapes while vaginal, groin, and breast vasocongestion measures were taken. The women indicated their subjective level of sexual arousal while viewing the tapes by positioning a lever device along a calibrated scale. The results indicated highly significant positive correlations among the cognitive and physiological measures for five out of six individual subjects, although the pooled group data failed to show significance. The methodology described in this research shows promise as a diagnostic and research tool.

Key words

cognitive physiological sexual arousal women 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corp 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • John P. Wincze
    • 1
  • Peter Hoon
    • 2
  • Emily Franck Hoon
    • 3
  1. 1.Brown University Medical School/Providence VA HospitalProvidenceUSA
  2. 2.Dalhousie UniversityHalifaxCanada
  3. 3.Nova Scotia HospitalDartmouthCanada

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