Human Ecology

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 275–289 | Cite as

Optimal hunting and Pleistocene extinction

  • David Webster
  • Gary Webster
Article

Abstract

A basic assumption of the Pleistocene extinction, or “overkill” hypothesis, is that rates of human predation on numerous genera of megafauna exceeded prey replacement rates. Previous assessments of this hypothesis have often stressed the technological or organizational capabilities of Paleolithic hunters to harvest prey in sufficient numbers to threaten extinction. Optimal foraging models and ethnographic observations of modern hunters-gatherers provide a logical basis for assessing the feasibility of alternative reconstructions of Paleolithic hunting strategies as well as their compatibility with the concept of critically high rates of predation sufficient to cause extinction.

Key words

Paleolithic hunting overkill optimality 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Webster
    • 1
  • Gary Webster
    • 1
  1. 1.The Pennsylvania State UniversityMont Alto

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