Journal of Gambling Studies

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 215–231 | Cite as

Prevalence studies and the development of services for problem gamblers and their families

  • Rachel A. Volberg
  • Mark G. Dickerson
  • Robert Ladouceur
  • Max W. Abbott

Abstract

Where funded by government, prevalence studies have typically led to the development of services for problem gamblers and their families. Such assessments of the need for services have been seen as the appropriate political response to growing expressions of concern about problem gambling that often follow moves to legislate for an increasing range of gambling products. This theme is apparent for Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States. In this paper, initiatives in these different jurisdictions are briefly summarized and tabulated.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rachel A. Volberg
    • 1
  • Mark G. Dickerson
    • 2
  • Robert Ladouceur
    • 3
  • Max W. Abbott
    • 4
  1. 1.Gemini ResearchRoaring Spring
  2. 2.Australian Institute for Gambling ResearchUniversity of Western SydneyMacarthur
  3. 3.Laval UniversityCanada
  4. 4.Auckland Institute of TechnologyAucklandNew Zealand

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