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Response to stimulant drug treatment in hyperactive children: Prediction from EEG and neurological findings

  • James H. Satterfield
  • Dennis P. Cantwell
  • Ronald E. Saul
  • Leonard I. Lesser
  • Robert L. Podosin
Article

Abstract

A study of neurological examinations, EEG findings, and behavioral responses to methylphenidate treatment in 57 hyperactive boys, 5 to 10 years of age, is reported and discussed. The results indicated that subjects with minor neurological abnormalities in 4 or more categories responded with significantly more improvement (p<.01) to methylphenidate treatment than subjects without abnormalities. Subjects with abnormal EEGs had significantly more improvement (p<.001) than those with normal EEGs. A significant correlation was found between the degree of evidence of brain dysfunction (obtained from EEG and neurological examinations) and the probability of response to methylphenidate treatment. It is suggested that both the neurological and the EEG examinations play a significant role in the assessment of hyperactive children.

Keywords

Significant Role Drug Treatment Behavioral Response Neurological Examination Methylphenidate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© V. H. Winston & Sons, Inc 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • James H. Satterfield
    • 1
  • Dennis P. Cantwell
    • 1
  • Ronald E. Saul
    • 1
  • Leonard I. Lesser
    • 1
  • Robert L. Podosin
    • 1
  1. 1.Andrew Norman Research CenterGateways Hospital Hyperkinetic Children's ClinicLos Angeles

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