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Journal of Youth and Adolescence

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 53–96 | Cite as

Young, middle, and late adolescents' comparisons of the functional importance of five significant relationships

  • Jacques D. Lempers
  • Dania S. Clark-Lempers
Article

Abstract

The present study investigated how young (11–13-year-old), middle (14–16-year-old), and late (17–19-year-old) adolescents compared the relative functional importance of their relationships with their mother, their father, their most important sibling, their best same-sex friend, and their most important teacher. Mothers and fathers were perceived as highly important sources of affection, instrumental aid, and reliable alliance by all adolescents; however, the parent-adolescent child relationship was also ranked high on the conflict dimension. Best same-sex friends were ranked highest in all three adolescent groups for intimacy and companionship. Siblings, too, were perceived as important sources of intimacy and companionship; they were also ranked high for the nurturance and conflict dimensions. Relationships with teachers received very low ratings in general.

Keywords

Significant Relationship Health Psychology Child Relationship Late Adolescent Functional Importance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacques D. Lempers
    • 1
  • Dania S. Clark-Lempers
    • 1
  1. 1.Iowa State UniversityAmes

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