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Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 34, Issue 4, pp 623–629 | Cite as

Multiple jejunal perforations secondary to cytomegalovirus in a patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome

Case report and review
  • Anthony J. DeRisoJr
  • M. Margaret Kemeny
  • Ramon A. Torres
  • Jorge M. Oliver
Case Report

Abstract

Disseminated cytomegalovirus infection in patients with AIDS usually involves the lungs, retina, esophagus, or colon. Gastrointestinal involvement may present clinically with fever, intractable diarrhea, and crampy abdominal pain. Ulcerations have been seen throughout the gastrointestinal tract, but perforations have been confined to the terminal ileum and colon. We report a case of a patient who presented with peritonitis with no prodromal symptoms and who, on exploration, had multiple large jejunal perforations secondary to cytomegalovirus enteropathy.

Keywords

Public Health Retina Diarrhea Abdominal Pain Gastrointestinal Tract 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony J. DeRisoJr
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Margaret Kemeny
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ramon A. Torres
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jorge M. Oliver
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Surgery, Surgical Oncology, Community Medicine, and PathologySt. Vincent's Hospital and Medical CenterNew York
  2. 2.New York Medical CollegeNew York

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