Journal of Religion and Health

, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp 267–278

Religion, Type A behavior, and health

  • Jeffrey S. Levin
  • C. David Jenkins
  • Robert M. Rose
Article

Abstract

In a study of air traffic controllers, religious differences are found in the way Type A behavior is associated with several health status indicators. Associations between the Jenkins Activity Survey (JAS) and physical illness incidence, health-promotive behavior, diastolic and systolic blood pressure, subjective distress and impulse control problems, and alcohol consumption are examined by religious attendance, religious affiliation, and change in affiliation. Findings confirm that Type A does not vary significantly by religion. However, there are several significant findings between Type A and various health indicators. Type A is associated with illness incidence, overall and more strongly in several religion, subgroups. Type A and alcohol consumption are related positively in Protestants and converts, and negatively in churchgoing Catholics. Type A is related to impulse control problems in churchgoing Protestants and to subjective distress in churchgoing Catholics. Finally, in individuals with weak or no religious ties, Type A is associated with lower blood pressure. This last finding suggests that in some people (for example, the irreligious or unchurched), the coronary-prone behavior pattern may have cardiovascular effects which are salutary in at least one respect.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Institutes of Religion and Health 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey S. Levin
    • 1
  • C. David Jenkins
    • 2
  • Robert M. Rose
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Gerontology at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor
  2. 2.Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston
  3. 3.University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston

Personalised recommendations