Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 425–435 | Cite as

Brief report: The relationship of learning disabilities and higher-level autism

  • Victoria Shea
  • Gary B. Mesibov
Brief Reports

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Victoria Shea
    • 1
  • Gary B. Mesibov
    • 1
  1. 1.University of North CarolinaUSA

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