Human Ecology

, Volume 3, Issue 3, pp 161–182 | Cite as

Is a cultural ethology possible?

  • F. T. CloakJr.
Article

Abstract

The possibility, desirability, and potential outcomes of applying ethological methods to the study of culture-specific human behaviors are investigated. Ethology and culture are explored. A new term, “instruction,” and its use in cultural ethology are proposed. Genetics and survival value are related to cultural ethology. A cultural ethology is given a possible theoretical foundation, and current attempts at a cultural ethology are appraised. A research program in cultural ethology and related fields is proposed.

Key words

ethology culture behavior natural selection 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. T. CloakJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Springfield

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