Human Ecology

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 35–64 | Cite as

Response to drought among farmers and herders in southern Kajiado District, Kenya

  • David J. Campbell

Abstract

From 1972 to 1976 rainfall in Kajiado District of Kenya was below normal. The capacity of the farming and herding systems to cope with the consequent reduction in production is discussed within a context of changing land-use patterns and altered resource availability. It is concluded that land-use planning to allocate the available land and water resources and to promote off-farm employment is required to reduce the vulnerability of the population to future drought conditions.

Key words

Kenya drought farming pastoralism rural development 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • David J. Campbell
    • 1
  1. 1.Geography and African StudiesMichigan State UniversityEast Lansing

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