Depressed lymphocyte responsiveness in autistic children

  • E. Gene Stubbs
  • Mary Lou Crawford
  • Denis R. Burger
  • Arthur A. Vandenbark

Abstract

Although there are associations linking autism with prenatal rubella, cytomegalovirus, syphilis, and varicella, the etiology of the autistic state remains obscure. Host defense against the etiologic agents postulated to be responsible for the autism-associated syndromes is believed to be primarily of the cell-mediated type. In this preliminary study, cellular immune function was assessed in vitro by phytohemagglutinin (PHA)stimulation of lymphocyte cultures. Twelve autistic children and 13 control subjects were compared. The autistic group exhibited a depressed lymphocyte transformation response to PHA when compared to the control subjects (p<.01).

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corp. 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Gene Stubbs
    • 2
  • Mary Lou Crawford
    • 2
  • Denis R. Burger
    • 1
  • Arthur A. Vandenbark
    • 1
  1. 1.Surgical Research LaboratoryVeterans Administration HospitalPortland
  2. 2.Crippled Children's DivisionUniversity of Oregon Health Sciences CenterPortland

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