Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 17, Issue 3, pp 315–332 | Cite as

The effects of teacher intrusion on social play interactions between children with autism and their nonhandicapped peers

  • Luanna H. Meyer
  • Ann Fox
  • Anita Schermer
  • Deanna Ketelsen
  • Nancy Montan
  • Kathy Maley
  • David Cole

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of two levels of teacher intrusion upon the behavior of elementary age children with autism and nonhandicapped peers during dyadic play interactions occurring in two special education classrooms. High versus low levels of teacher intrusion were contrasted in a mixed between- and within-subjects design counterbalanced for order across the two conditions. There were few differences in behavior across the two conditions, though the low-intrusion condition was associated with higher levels of toy contact, appropriate and inappropriate play, and lower levels of spontaneous verbalizations by the students with autism. There was no difference in the occurrence of excess behavior by condition. Results are discussed with respect to future investigations of effective teacher mediation to prepare children for positive peer interactions.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luanna H. Meyer
    • 2
  • Ann Fox
    • 1
  • Anita Schermer
    • 3
  • Deanna Ketelsen
    • 1
  • Nancy Montan
    • 1
  • Kathy Maley
    • 3
  • David Cole
    • 4
  1. 1.Minneapolis Public SchoolsUSA
  2. 2.Division of Special Education and RehabilitationSyracuse UniversitySyracuse
  3. 3.University of MinnesotaUSA
  4. 4.University of Notre DameUSA

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