Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 17, Issue 4, pp 565–576

Parent and professional evaluations of family stress associated with characteristics of autism

  • James M. Bebko
  • M. Mary Konstantareas
  • Judy Springer
Article

Abstract

This study assessed the impact of various individual symptoms of autism on mothers and fat hers, and professionals' accuracy in estimating parents' perceived stress levels. Mothers and fathers of 20 autistic children, and 20 therapists working with those children, independently rated the severity of common symptoms of autism in their child, and how stressful they found each symptom; therapists estimated parental stress. The autistic child's language and cognitive impairment were judged by all raters as most severe and stressful. In contrast with other studies, individual parents agreed on both symptom severity and degree of stress. Parents of older children judged symptom severity to be lower, but fathers reported a continued high level of stress. Professionals judged families as more stressed by the child symptoms than did families themselves. Implications for intervention and casework are discussed.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • James M. Bebko
    • 2
  • M. Mary Konstantareas
    • 1
  • Judy Springer
    • 3
  1. 1.Clarke Institute of PsychiatryCanada
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyYork UniversityNorth YorkCanada
  3. 3.The Geneva CentreSwitzerland

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