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Educational Psychology Review

, Volume 8, Issue 3, pp 299–325 | Cite as

A capacity theory of writing: Working memory in composition

  • Deborah McCutchen
Article

Abstract

The review examines ways in which working memory contributes to individual and particularly to developmental differences in writing skill. It begins with a brief definition of working memory and then summarizes current debates regarding working memory and capacity theories in the field of reading. It is argued that a capacity theory of writing can provide a framework within which to consider the development of writing skill, and relevant data are discussed. Effects of capacity limitations are documented in all three component writing processes: planning, translating, and reviewing.

Key words

writing composition working memory language processing text production 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deborah McCutchen
    • 1
  1. 1.Educational PsychologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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