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, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 95–108 | Cite as

Inpatient adolescent and latency-age children's perspectives on the curative factors in group psychotherapy

  • Jeffrey L. Chase
Article

Abstract

Thirty-three adolescent and 11 child psychiatric inpatients were administered a downward revision of Yalom's (1970) 60-item Q-sort, which sets forth 12 putative “curative factors” of group, to assess patient perceptions of which factors in group therapy are most curative. The impact that age, patient level of functioning, and time in treatment had on which factors were most valued was assessed. Patient perceptions of the value of group compared to other treatment modalities were also assessed. Both child and adolescent subjects highly valued the factors of Hope, Cohesiveness, and Universality. Patients' level of functioning had limited effects on adolescents' perceptions, but did effect children's perceptions of what was most valued in group. The modest effect of time in treatment was attributed to the short duration of inpatient treatment. Implications for inpatient adolescent and child group therapy and future research are explored.

Keywords

Short Duration Treatment Modality Group Therapy Limit Effect Cross Cultural Psychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Eastern Group Psychotherapy Society 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey L. Chase
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyRadford UniversityRadford

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