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Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 23, Issue 6, pp 729–749 | Cite as

Developmental change in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in boys: A four-year longitudinal study

  • Elizabeth L. Hart
  • Benjamin B. Lahey
  • Rolf Loeber
  • Brooks Applegate
  • Paul J. Frick
Article

Abstract

One hundred six clinic-referred boys meeting criteria for DSM-III-R attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (mean age 9.4 years) were assessed annually for 4 years using structured interviews of multiple informants. Hyperactivity—impulsivity symptoms declined with increasing age, but inattention symptoms did not. Rather, inattention declined only from the first to the second assessment and remained stable thereafter in boys of all ages. The rate of decline in hyperactivity—impulsivity symptoms was independent of the amount and type of treatment received. Boys who still met criteria for ADHD in Years 3 and 4 were significantly younger, more hyperactive—impulsive, and more likely to exhibit conduct disorder in Year 1 than boys who no longer met criteria in Years 3 and 4.

Keywords

Longitudinal Study Multiple Informant Structure Interview Developmental Change Conduct Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elizabeth L. Hart
    • 1
  • Benjamin B. Lahey
    • 2
  • Rolf Loeber
    • 3
  • Brooks Applegate
    • 4
  • Paul J. Frick
    • 5
  1. 1.Yale Child Study CenterNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.University of Chicago School of MedicineChicagoUSA
  3. 3.University of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  4. 4.University of MiamiCoral GablesUSA
  5. 5.University of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA

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