Genetica

, Volume 96, Issue 3, pp 303–306 | Cite as

Geographic differentiation in wing shape inDrosophila melanogaster

  • Alexandra G. Imasheva
  • Oleg A. Bubli
  • Oleg E. Lazebny
  • Lev A. Zhivotovsky
Short Communication

Abstract

Genetic variation of a suite of 12 morphometric wing characters was examined in 16 natural populations ofDrosophila melanogaster from Eastern Europe and Central Asia using principal component analysis. The posterior wing compartment was found to differ in shape between the Eastern European and Central Asian populations. This result is in agreement with data on wing shape variation from exposure to high and low temperatures under laboratory conditions.

Key words

geographic variation morphometric characters wing Drosophila melanogaster 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexandra G. Imasheva
    • 1
  • Oleg A. Bubli
    • 1
  • Oleg E. Lazebny
    • 1
  • Lev A. Zhivotovsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Vavilov Institute of General GeneticsMoscowRussia

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