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, Volume 23, Issue 1–2, pp 143–163 | Cite as

Higher education, democracy, and development: Implications for Newly Industrialized Countries

  • Philip G. Altbach
Section IV: The University and Culture

Abstract

Universities are central institutions in modern societies, providing education, research, and communication of scientific information needed by technologically based societies. The focus of this essay is on the role of universities in the emerging economies of the Newly Industrializing Countries (NIC) of the Pacific Rim, although this discussion has relevance for all countries seeking to enter the ranks of the industrialized nations. Universities in the NICs are especially important because they are the windows through which modern science enters society. Academic institutions have also served to provide an important critical voice to emerging democracies because their faculties often contribute to public debates and discussions. The roles of faculty and students in the development of the NICs is also examined in this essay.

Keywords

universities communication democratic institutions students faculty economic development political activism Research 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip G. Altbach
    • 1
  1. 1.Comparative Education Center Graduate School of EducationState University of New York at BuffaloBuffaloUSA

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