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Sex Roles

, Volume 30, Issue 3–4, pp 269–288 | Cite as

On aggression, human rights, and hegemonic discourse: The case of a murder for family honor in Israel

  • Ilsa M. Glazer
  • Wahiba Abu Ras
Article

Abstract

Gossip, while a mean-spirited act of verbal aggression, has recently been considered eufunctional because it affirms traditional morality, social cohesion, and cultural stability. In a similar vein, in the name of cultural diversity, human rights anthropologists affirm the value of tradition, cohesion and stability. Extending Nader's theoretical framework on hegemonic discourse, this paper demonstrates the androcentricity inherent in these views. When Arab village women's gossip creates the climate in which the murder of a young woman is inevitable, a feminist anthropological perspective addressing the androcentric hegemonic discourse on aggression and human rights, however sensitive to multiple voices, requires challenging the assumption that aggression is eufunctional because tradition, cohesion, and stability are inherently positive.

Keywords

Young Woman Social Psychology Cultural Diversity Social Cohesion Similar Vein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ilsa M. Glazer
    • 1
  • Wahiba Abu Ras
    • 2
  1. 1.Kingsborough Community CollegeCity University of New YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Political AffairsUnited NationsUSA

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