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Sex Roles

, Volume 30, Issue 3–4, pp 177–188 | Cite as

Sex differences in physical, verbal, and indirect aggression: A review of recent research

  • Kaj Björkqvist
Article

Abstract

In the present article, recent research on sex differences in aggressive styles is reviewed. The concept of indirect aggression is particularly presented and discussed. It is argued that it is incorrect, or rather, nonsensical, to claim that males are more aggressive than females. A theory regarding the development of styles of aggressive behavior is presented.

Keywords

Social Psychology Aggressive Behavior Present Article Indirect Aggression Aggressive Style 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kaj Björkqvist
    • 1
  1. 1.Abo Akadami UniversityAustralia

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