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Group

, Volume 17, Issue 4, pp 210–234 | Cite as

Discussions on the large group

  • Yvonne M. Agazarian
  • Frances B. Carter
Article

Abstract

At the heart of this article are dialogues with three distinguished large group leaders: Patrick de Mare, Earl Hopper and Lionel Kreeger. They address, with Yvonne Agazarian, some of the major issues in leading large groups: terror and chaos, projective identification, annihilation anxiety, and the impact of size, structure, and boundary management on the potential for change and transformation in the large group. Also discussed are the twin heritage of both psychodynamic and sociological theory and the influence of psychoanalysis, basic assumption theory, information theory, general systems theory, and field theory on the current understanding of large group as the context for therapeutic change. The authors also introduce a theory of living human systems, which views the large group as one system in a hierarchy of isomorphic systems and identifies the subgroup as the fulcrum for change. From this systems-centered perspective, changing the structure and function of communication within subgroups simultaneously changes both the large group and the individual subgroup members.

Keywords

Field Theory Information Theory System Theory General System Basic Assumption 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Eastern Group Psychotherapy Society 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yvonne M. Agazarian
    • 1
  • Frances B. Carter
    • 2
  1. 1.Philadelphia
  2. 2.Philadelphia

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