Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 17, Issue 6, pp 1231–1242

Behavioral and electrophysiological responses of Aphids to host and nonhost plant volatiles

  • Stephen F. Nottingham
  • Jim Hardie
  • Glenn W. Dawson
  • Alastair J. Hick
  • John A. Pickett
  • Lester J. Wadhams
  • Christine M. Woodcock
Article

Abstract

Alate and apterous virginoparae ofAphis fabae Scop, and alate virginoparae ofBrevicoryne brassicae (L.), walking in a linear track olfactometer, were attracted by odor from leaves of their host plants.A. fabae responded to odor from undamaged but not damaged bean leaves. Gynoparae (autumn migrants) ofA. fabae, however, did not respond to their host plant (spindle,Euonymus europaeus) odor. Odors of certain nonhost plants masked the attractiveness of the host plant leaves, but tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) and summer savory (Satureja hortensis) volatiles repelledB. brassicae andA. fabae, respectively. 3-Butenyl isothiocyanate attractedB. brassicae andLipaphis erysimi (Kalt.), the latter species being more sensitive in both behavioral and electrophysiological studies. Isothiocyanate receptors were found on the antennae ofA. fabae, which was repelled by these compounds, 4-pentenyl isothiocyanate being the most active.

Key words

Aphid Aphis fabae Brevicoryne brassicae Homoptera Aphididae Lipaphis erysimi olfaction plant volatiles isothiocyanate electrophysiology repellent odor masking 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen F. Nottingham
    • 1
  • Jim Hardie
    • 1
  • Glenn W. Dawson
    • 2
  • Alastair J. Hick
    • 2
  • John A. Pickett
    • 2
  • Lester J. Wadhams
    • 2
  • Christine M. Woodcock
    • 2
  1. 1.Agricultural and Food Research Council Linked Research Group in Aphid Biology Department of BiologyImperial College of Science, Technology and MedicineLondonUK
  2. 2.AFRC Institute of Arable Crops Research Rothamsted Experimental StationHarpendenUK
  3. 3.AFRC Linked Research Group in Aphid BiologyImperial College at Silwood ParkAscotUK

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