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Higher Education

, Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 17–35 | Cite as

Korean academic women: Multiple roles, multiple challenges

  • Linda K. Johnsrud
Article

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of Korean academic women regarding their faculty careers within Korean universities. Personal interviews were conducted with thirteen female faculty members as well other informants (administrators, male faculty and graduate students) at three large private universities in the Republic of Korea: Yonsei University, Ewha Women's University and Dankook University. The study focuses on 1) the experience of Western-trained academic women in securing faculty positions in Korean universities, 2) the work load and responsibilities of women faculty within the academy, and 3) the impact of their personal lives and social roles on their professional achievement and satisfaction. Comparisons are drawn between the experiences of these Korean academic women and what we have learned about the experiences of academic women in Western institutions.

Keywords

Faculty Member Personal Interview Personal Life Faculty Position Faculty Career 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda K. Johnsrud
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Hawaii at ManoaHonoluluUSA

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