Amino Acids

, Volume 17, Issue 3, pp 315–322 | Cite as

Urine glycyl-L-proline increase and skin trophicity

  • J. Le
  • C. Perier
  • S. Peyroche
  • F. Rascle
  • M. A. Blanchon
  • R. Gonthier
  • J. Frey
  • A. Chamson
Short Communication

Summary

Glycyl-L-proline (gly-pro) is an end product of collagen metabolism that is further cleaved by prolidase (EC 3.4.13.9); the resulting proline molecules are recycled into collagen or other proteins. We postulated a relationship between defective gly-pro hydrolysis, increased collagen degradation and skin destruction. This relationship was tested using HPLC to measure the gly-pro in urine. 24 hour urine samples were collected from 27 old people (86 ± 6 years old), of whom 15 were suffering from skin pressure sores of the sacrum or calcaneus. The urine from patients with pressure sores contained significantly more gly-pro than the urine from the control. A cut-off at 7μmol/ mmol creatinine gave the test a positive predictive value of 70%. Collagen breakdown was also increased as indicated by the increase of hydroxyproline (hyp) in the urine. But this breakdown seemed to stop at the gly-pro step.

Keywords

Amino acids Glycyl-L-proline Urine Trophicity Collagen 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Berg RA, Kerr JS (1992) Nutritional aspects of collagen metabolism. Ann Rev Nutr 12: 369–390Google Scholar
  2. Chamson A, Voigtlander V, Myara I, Frey J (1989) Collagen biosynthesis anomalies in prolidase deficiency: effect of glycyl-L-proline on the degradation of newly synthesized collagen. Clin Physiol Biochem 7: 128–136PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Charpentier C, Dagbovie K, Larregue M, Johnstone RAW, Lemonnier A (1981) Prolidase deficiency with iminodipeptiduria: biochemical investigations and first results of therapeutic assay. J Inher Metab Dis 4: 77–78PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Frey J, Chamson A, Raby N (1993) Separation of amino acids using ion-paired reversedphase high performance liquid chromatography with special reference to collagen hydrolysate. Amino Acids 4: 45–51Google Scholar
  5. Goodman SI, Solomons CC, Muschenheim F, McIntyre CA, Miles B, O'Brien D (1968) A syndrome resembling lathyrism associated with iminopeptiduria. Am J Med 45: 152–159PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Granouillet R, Rascle F, Sicallac P, Raby N, Frey J (1996) Urine sodium, potassium, calcium, urea and creatinine determination by Ektachem 250. Clin Chem 42: 105–106PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Laurent GJ (1987) Dynamic state of collagen: pathways of collagen degradation in vivo and their possible role in regulation of collagen mass. Am J Physiol 252: Cl-9Google Scholar
  8. Myara I, Charpentier C, Wolfrom C, Gautier M, Lemonnier A, Larregue M, Chamson A, Frey J (1983) In vitro response to ascorbate and manganese in fibroblasts from a patient with prolidase deficiency and iminodipeptiduria cell growth, prolidase activity and collagen metabolism. J Inher Metab Dis 6: 27–31PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Senboshi Y, Oono T, Arata J (1996) Localization of prolidase gene expression in scar tissue using in situ hybridization. J Dermatol Sci 12: 163–171PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Stegeman H (1985) Mikrobestimmung von Hydroxyprolin mit Chloramin T and P-Dimethylaminobenzaldehyd. Z Physiol Chem 311: 41–45Google Scholar
  11. Yoshida K, Nakajima S, Ootani T, Saito A, Amano N, Takano K, Uchiyama Y, Haruki E (1996) Serum prolyl endopeptidase activities of patients with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type and of those with vascular dementia. J Clin Biochem Nutr 21: 227–235Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Le
    • 1
  • C. Perier
    • 1
  • S. Peyroche
    • 1
  • F. Rascle
    • 1
  • M. A. Blanchon
    • 1
  • R. Gonthier
    • 1
  • J. Frey
    • 1
  • A. Chamson
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de BiochimieFaculté de MédecineSaint-Etienne Cedex 2France

Personalised recommendations