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Protoplasma

, Volume 146, Issue 1, pp 28–34 | Cite as

Microtubule organization in the sperm ofTradescantia virginiana

  • B. A. Palevitz
  • M. Cresti
Article

Summary

Microtubules were visualized in the sperm ofTradescantia virginiana pollen tubes grownin vitro and processed for antitubulin immunocytochemistry. The sperm contain thick microtubule bundles from which emerge numerous branches of various dimensions disposed longitudinally and helically along the cell axis. Sperm are usually spindle or cigar-shaped, but cells of various sizes and shapes can be found. All contain microtubule arrays. No F-actin was detected in sperm using rhodamine-phalloidin staining. Sperm microtubules are discussed in terms of their potential roles in cell shaping and motility and their origin during generative cell division.

Keywords

Generative cell Microtubule Sperm Pollen Tradescantia 

Abbreviations

DAPI

4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole

IgG

immunoglobulin G

M+W

Mascarenhas and Walker medium

Mf

microfilament

Mt

microtubule

PBA

phosphate-buffered saline

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. A. Palevitz
    • 1
  • M. Cresti
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BotanyUniversity of GeorgiaAthens
  2. 2.Dipartimento di Biologia AmbientaleUniversitá di SienaSiena

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