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Plant and Soil

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 313–331 | Cite as

A comparison of manganese sources using tomato plants grown on marl, peat and sand soils

  • J. G. A. Fiskel
  • G. A. Mourkides
Article

Summary

The availability of manganous oxide, γ manganese dioxide and MnEDTA was compared to that of manganous sulfate at several equivalent rates on a Mn-deficient peaty muck, marl and on Mn-sufficient Scranton sand. Tomato plants grown in pot studies were analyzed for manganese and iron. Mn-deficiency leaf symptoms were in general agreement with the manganese level in the plant and the Fe/Mn ratio. Iron intake and manganese intake showed some evidence of inverse relationships. Manganous sulfate was slightly more available than manganous oxide which, in turn, was more available than γMnO2 or MnEDTA.

Keywords

Oxide Iron Sulfate Dioxide Manganese 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff 1955

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. G. A. Fiskel
    • 1
  • G. A. Mourkides
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SoilsFlorida Agricultural Experiment StationGainesville

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