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Radiation and Environmental Biophysics

, Volume 20, Issue 3, pp 195–200 | Cite as

Residual radiation effect in the murine spleen. In situ measurement by 125-iodo-deoxyuridine retention

  • G. E. Hübner
  • K. -H. v. Wangenheim
  • L. E. Feinendegen
Article

Summary

To investigate whether residual radiation damage in hematopoietic tissue is measurable in situ by a change in cell turnover, the retention of the thymidine analogue 5-(125-I)iodo-2′-deoxyuridine (125-IUdR) following incorporation into DNA of cells in bone marrow and spleen of mice was measured 35 days after 0–500 rad whole body gamma irradiation.

In the bone marrow a rapid and a slow turnover component of 125-IUdR retention were found. Both components were almost identical for unirradiated and irradiated mice. In the spleen the 125-IUdR retention curves exhibited three components with increasingly prolonged half-times. In the second component the half-time was longer in irradiated than in unirradiated mice. This was dose-dependent.

The increased half-time of 125-IUdR retention in irradiated spleens may be caused by direct cellular damage of long-lived cells (lymphocytes, early hematopoietic progenitor cells) or/and by diminished stimulation of proliferation by microenvironmental or long-range factors.

Keywords

Thymidine Hematopoietic Progenitor Deoxyuridine Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Cell Turnover 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. E. Hübner
    • 1
  • K. -H. v. Wangenheim
    • 1
  • L. E. Feinendegen
    • 1
  1. 1.Kernforschungsanlage Jülich GmbHMedizinisches InstitutJülichFederal Republic of Germany

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