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Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 335–339 | Cite as

Dientamoeba fragilis, a protozoan parasite in adult members of a semicommunal group

  • Victoria Millet
  • Mary J. Spencer
  • Martha Chapin
  • Morgan Stewart
  • Jo Ann Yatabe
  • Thomas Brewer
  • Lynne S. Garcia
Original Articles

Abstract

Dientamoeba fragilis is an intestinal protozoan parasite associated with gastrointestinal symptoms. This study was undertaken in a semicommunal group reported to have a high prevalence of this parasite. Stools were collected from 81 adult group members. Intestinal parasites were observed in stool specimens of 45 (56%) of the 81 adults;D. fragilis was found in 33 (41%) subjects. This paper describes the clinical findings and treatment of 26 adults withD. fragilis alone or with a commensal. Gastrointestinal symptoms were observed in 22 (85%) of infected subjects; abdominal pain and excessive flatus were significantly more common in this group. Diiohydroxyquin 650 mg three times a day for 20 days eliminated the parasite in 10 (83%) of the 12 treated, although three subjects required a second course of therapy. Parasitic infection should be considered in patients with vague gastrointestinal symptoms, especially those living in endemic areas, in close proximity, or with a history of foreign travel.

Keywords

Public Health Abdominal Pain Clinical Finding Endemic Area Gastrointestinal Symptom 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Digestive Disease Systems, Inc 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Victoria Millet
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Mary J. Spencer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Martha Chapin
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Morgan Stewart
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jo Ann Yatabe
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Thomas Brewer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Lynne S. Garcia
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Divisions of Primary Care Pediatrics and Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, UCLA School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaLos Angeles
  2. 2.Division of Infection Control, Department of Nursing, UCLA School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaLos Angeles
  3. 3.Microbiology Section, Clinical Laboratories, Department of Pathology, UCLA School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaLos Angeles
  4. 4.Division of Epidemiology, UCLA School of Public HealthUniversity of CaliforniaLos Angeles

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