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Journal of Child and Family Studies

, Volume 2, Issue 4, pp 317–326 | Cite as

Psychosexual, attitudinal, and developmental characteristics of juvenile female sexual perpetrators in a residential treatment setting

  • John A. HunterJr.
  • Lenard J. Lexier
  • Dennis W. Goodwin
  • Patsy A. Browne
  • Christine Dennis
Regular Papers

Abstract

A descriptive survey was conducted on ten juvenile female sexual offenders in a residential treatment program. Similarities to juvenile male perpetrators were found in both an etiological link to prior victimization, as well as pattern of perpetration. These youth typically were molested by a number of individuals beginning at a young age. Their own sexual victimizations were notable for having been molested by not only a male perpetrator (all of the youth), but also a female (six of the ten). Eight of the females reported having been sexually aroused to one of their own victimizations, with this experience of arousal rated as particularly psychologically distressful when the perpetrator was of the same gender. Their patterns of perpetration began approximately five years following their first sexual victimization experience. Like their male counterparts, they tended to be repeat offenders, molested children of both sexes, and fantasized about such behavior prior to the first act of perpetration. Furthermore, these youth generally acted alone in the commission of their acts of perpetration, and engaged in sexual behaviors which were relatively invasive. Directions for future research are discussed.

Key words

juvenile female sexual offenders, sexual victimization arousal sexual behaviors 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • John A. HunterJr.
    • 1
  • Lenard J. Lexier
    • 1
  • Dennis W. Goodwin
    • 1
  • Patsy A. Browne
    • 1
  • Christine Dennis
    • 1
  1. 1.The Behavioral Studies ProgramThe Pines Treatment CenterPortsmouth

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