Archives of Virology

, Volume 116, Issue 1–4, pp 261–265 | Cite as

Influenza viral infection of swine in the United States 1988–1989

  • T. M. Chambers
  • Virginia S. Hinshaw
  • Y. Kawaoka
  • B. C. Easterday
  • R. G. Webster
Brief Report

Summary

Swine are an animal reservoir for influenza viruses capable of causing disease in humans. A serological survey in 1988–1989 demonstrates that subtype H1 influenza viruses continue to circulate at high frequency among swine in the north-central U.S.A. (average 51% incidence). Subtype H3 viruses antigenically similar to current human H3 viruses are circulating at low frequency (average 1.1%), particularly in the southeast U.S.A.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. M. Chambers
    • 1
  • Virginia S. Hinshaw
    • 2
  • Y. Kawaoka
    • 1
  • B. C. Easterday
    • 2
  • R. G. Webster
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Virology and Molecular BiologySt. Jude Children's Research HospitalMemphis
  2. 2.Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA

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